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This translation has been automatically generated and has not been verified for accuracy. Full Disclaimer

Choose a province or territory:

Alberta

Visit Alberta’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Saskatchewan

Visit Saskatchewan’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Manitoba

Visit Manitoba’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Ontario

Visit Ontario’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Quebec

    Notes:

  • 1,317 confirmed cases from the month of April were added retrospectively in Quebec causing a spike on May 3, 2020.
  • On March 23, Quebec announced that cases tested positive by hospital labs are considered confirmed, resulting in a significant increase in numbers that day.

Visit Quebec’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

New Brunswick

Visit New Brunswick’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Prince Edward Island

Visit Prince Edward Island’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Nova Scotia

Visit Nova Scotia’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Visit Newfoundland and Labrador’s provincial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Yukon

Visit Yukon’s territorial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Northwest Territories

Visit Northwest Territories’s territorial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

Nunavut

    Notes:

  • Further testing has determined that Nunavut's one case announced on April 30 was a false positive.

Visit Nunavut’s territorial website for tracking case counts and latest information.

The numbers in these charts are updated three times daily. Level 2 of its five-level restrictions regime, which allows gyms to open and 50-per-cent capacity at dine-in restaurants. In early July the province entered the first stage of a restart plan called Together Again, which allows non-essential travel from the rest of Canada.

Moving Forward plan, which will still involve physical distancing through the summer but allows more freedom to travel to the province, especially for people who’ve had their shots.

five-phase reopening plan, which allows restaurants to have tables of up to 10 people indoors or outdoors, opens retail stores to 75-per-cent capacity and resumes full service at hair salons, spas and tattoo parlours.

  • Public gatherings: Outdoor gatherings of up to 25 without masks or distancing are allowed. Indoors, Nova Scotians are limited to their household plus a maximum of 10 other people.
  • Interprovincial travel: Most people from outside Atlantic Canada have to check in before they travel to Nova Scotia, but depending on their vaccination status, they may not have to self-isolate. Here is the full list of rules for all interprovincial travel.
  • COVID-19 testing: Here is the province’s self-assessment tool.

Phase 2 of its Path to Green plan, which reopened the province to Atlantic Canadian travel. The third phase, which will lift all restrictions, is expected to take effect on New Brunswick Day, Aug. 2.

  • Public gatherings: People are allowed to contact all family in friends in “yellow” areas of the province and outdoor gatherings of up to 50 are allowed if physical distancing is in place. Informal indoor gatherings of 20 people or fewer are also allowed.
  • Interprovincial travel: Out-of-province travellers with one dose of vaccine aren’t required to isolate and those with no vaccine must isolate for 5 to 7 days after seeing a negative test on one of those days. It has also opened the Atlantic Bubble to Nova Scotia, though Nova Scotia is requiring New Brunswick travellers to self-isolate for 14 days.
  • COVID-19 testing: Here is the province’s self-assessment tool.

Check the province’s alert-status map to see what the rules are near you, and the Quebec reopening plan to see what’s in store later this summer.

  • Public gatherings: Indoors, the limit for gatherings at btcc交易所官网home is 10 people from different addresses or a maximum or the members of three households; outdoors, it’s 20 people or three households.
  • Interprovincial travel: Cross-border travel between Ontario and Quebec has been open since mid-June. There are no ongoing restrictions or warnings for travel within Quebec.
  • COVID-19 testing: Quebec’s toll-free assessment number is 1-877-644-4545. A nurse will ask about your situation and advise on next steps.

Roadmap to Reopen plan in June and July. Stage 3, which takes effect July 16, lifts all limits on patrons per table at restaurants and opens movie theatres and performing-arts venues.

  • Public gatherings: Once Stage 3 begins, the limit is 25 indoors and 100 outdoors.
  • Interprovincial travel: Domestic entrants to Ontario do not have to self-isolate.
  • COVID-19 testing: Here is the province’s self-assessment tool.

orange, or restricted, stage of its regime, and will remain so until at least Aug. 2. The first stage of the reopening plan began on June 26.

  • Public gatherings: Private gatherings with people outside the household aren’t allowed indoors or outdoors, but public events of five indoors and 25 outdoors are permitted.
  • Interprovincial travel: Fully vaccinated people entering Manitoba don’t have to self-isolate, but 14 days of isolation are required for partly vaccinated or unvaccinated people. Within Manitoba, no travel north of the 53rd parallel is allowed, with some exceptions for residents and essential services.
  • COVID-19 testing: Here is the province’s self-assessment tool and a list of where the testing centres are.

Here is the province’s self-assessment tool.

Reopening for Summer plan was the fastest restart regime in Canada: All restrictions were lifted on July 1, though some isolation rules remain for confirmed COVID-19 cases, and some settings may still require masks.

  • Public gatherings: No restrictions.
  • Interprovincial travel: New arrivals to Alberta don’t have to self-isolate.
  • COVID-19 testing: Here is the province’s self-assessment tool for the public, and their separate one for health-care workers and teachers.

a four-stage plan to reopen as more of its population is vaccinated, with the goal of lifting all COVID-19 restrictions by September. The third, current stage allows indoor gyms and religious services to operate at capacity, lifts the limits on table groups at restaurants (but still prohibits tables from mingling with each other) and reopened interprovincial recreational travel.

  • Public gatherings: No restrictions for private gatherings indoors and outdoors. Organized indoor gatherings can have up to 50 people or 50-per-cent capacity, whichever is more; outdoor organized gatherings can have 5,000 or 50 per cent.
  • Interprovincial travel: All cross-province travel is permitted without any self-isolation requirements.
  • COVID-19 testing: Here is the province’s self-assessment tool.

contact your local health centre.

Emerging Wisely plan doesn’t have phases; instead, it gives a fluid list of risk-reduction advice and estimated dates for when gathering limits, self-isolation requirements and permitted indoor activities will change.

  • Public gatherings: Indoor and outdoor gatherings of up to 200 are allowed, and event organizers can apply for an exemption if they expect more people.
  • Interterritorial travel: Leisure travel to the Northwest Territories is prohibited. Fully vaccinated people can come for work or family reasons without having to self-isolate; for partly vaccinated people, isolation is a minimum of eight days plus a negative COVID-19 test, and for unvaccinated people, it’s 10 days.
  • COVID-19 testing: Here is the territory’s self-assessment tool.

The Yukon’s A Path Forward plan currently keeps household bubbles and gathering limits fairly strict, but that will begin to change in the next phase.

  • Public gatherings: Households can interact with a bubble of up to 20 people from up to five households without physical distancing.
  • Interterritorial travel: Those entering Yukon don’t have to self-isolate if they’re fully vaccinated or coming from within Canada.
  • COVID-19 testing: Here is the territory’s self-assessment tool.

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